Botox Injections

Botox Injections for Migraines

Botox is a neurotoxin that is injected to treat a variety of ailments, such as facial wrinkles (typically along the forehead and in between the eyebrows), axillary hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating in the armpit), cervical dystonia (the contracting of neck muscles), strabismus (improper eye alignment), chronic headaches and migraines, blepharospasm (eyelid twitching), among others.

How is botox administered and how does it work?

Botox injections for migraines is administered as an injection and the dosing depends on what condition it is being used to treat. Botox works by paralyzing muscle activity and temporarily blocking nerve signals to certain muscles. The toxin is produced by the microbe that causes botulism, a type of food poisoning.

What are the common side effects?

Common side effects caused by Botox injections include:

  • Rash
  • Headache
  • Neck pain
  • Nausea
  • Itching
  • Pain or tenderness at the injection site.

Is botox for migraines and headache disorders FDA approved?

Botox injections for chronic headaches and migraines were approved by the FDA in 2010 and are covered by some insurances. Injections are administered every three to four months in the muscles of the forehead and neck.

Where are the injection sites for botox?

The standardized injection sites are:

  • Suboccipital
  • Frontalis
  • Temporalis
  • Glabellar

Other injection sites will be determined by your physician.

Does botox work better for specific migraine and headache types?

Botox injections are primarily used to treat those that suffer from tension-type headaches, which is a type of headache and migraine. Chronic tension headaches occur (generally) on a near-daily basis and is associated with contracted muscles in the neck and scalp. In comparison to migraines, tension headaches vary in duration and are less severe.

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